Heart Attack Symptoms in Women

A heart attack strikes someone about every 34 seconds. It occurs when the blood flow that brings oxygen to the heart muscle is severely reduced or cut off completely. This happens because the arteries that supply the heart with blood can slowly narrow from a buildup of fat, cholesterol and other substances (plaque).

Many women think the signs of a heart attack are unmistakable — the image of the elephant comes to mind — but in fact they can be subtler and sometimes confusing. You could feel so short of breath, as though you ran a marathon, but you haven't made a move.

Some women experiencing a heart attack describe upper back pressure that feels like squeezing or a rope being tied around them. Dizziness, lightheadedness or actually fainting are other symptoms to look for.

Take care of yourself:


Heart disease is preventable. Here are some tips:

  • Schedule an appointment with your healthcare provider to learn your personal risk for heart disease.

  • Quit smoking. Did you know that just one year after you quit, you’ll cut your risk of coronary heart
    disease
    by 50 percent?

  • Start an exercise program. Just walking 30 minutes a day can lower your risk for heart attack and stroke.

  • Modify your family’s diet if needed.   For example, with poultry, use the leaner light meat (breasts) instead of the fattier dark meat (legs and thighs), and be sure to remove the skin.

 

 

Heart Attack Signs in Women

        
  • Uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain in the center of your chest. It lasts more than a few minutes, or goes away and comes back.
        

  • Pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw or stomach.
        

  • Shortness of breath with or without chest discomfort.
        

  • Other signs such as breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea or lightheadedness.
        

  • As with men, women’s most common heart attack symptom is chest pain or discomfort. But women  are somewhat more likely than men to experience some of the other common symptoms, particularly shortness of breath, nausea/vomiting and back or jaw pain.

 

If you have any of these signs, don’t wait more than five minutes before calling for help. Call 9-1-1 and get to a hospital right away.

 


Source-American Heart Association

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